Hormonal fertility treatment help women undergoing chemotherapy

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By blocking the production of estrogen, the treatment causes a temporary menopause and better preserves fertility of the patient. (Photo Archive)

The results of a test done in the United States (U.S.) and published Friday show that hormone therapy helps young women with a certain type of breast cancer to better preserve fertility during chemotherapy and prolong his life.
Chemotherapy also brings the risk of causing ovarian failure by decreasing the amount and quality of stored eggs in the ovaries, a nonrenewable number.
To preserve their ability to have children, a woman can now, before starting chemotherapy, use frozen oocytes or embryos after ovarian stimulation.
This phase 3 clinical study shows that a measure like this can be avoided with a monthly injection of goserelin during chemotherapy, reducing by 64 percent the risk of ovarian failure.
By blocking the production of estrogen, the treatment causes a temporary menopause and better preserves fertility of the patient.
Promising results
Only 8 percent of patients who received a monthly injection of this hormone showed ovarian failure after two years, compared to 22 percent in the control group.
Moreover, these women were also twice as likely to have a normal pregnancy after finishing chemotherapy compared to those who had not received hormone treatment, the researchers stressed.”Preserving fertility is an objective and a major concern for young women to breast cancer and the results of this test are diagnosed clinic will provide a simple alternative that could eventually be applied to other cancers,” said Dr. Halle Moore, the lead author of the Cleveland Clinic, the eastern United States.
“Not only goserelin shown as very safe, but also effective to the extent that the treatment increases the chance for getting pregnant and giving birth to a child who is in good health after chemotherapy,” he added.
He also indicated that he was surprised to find that goserelin prolong life of patients.
In the U.S., each year about 49,000 women under 50 are diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and about 11,000 of these are under 40 years. In this group, about 15 percent have a tumor hormone receptor-negative.